Choco Skulls
Is it Friday or what!? Jump start your weekend with some more delicious candy from Jespers art collection!
Candy bomb
Our very own Jesper has created a series of pictures combining candy with death and destruction. To see the other ones you can either visit the art gallery in the hillbilly town of Karlskoga where they are currently being displayed, or come back here later and hope they make it here as well.
Kolla! first post!
As mentioned before we are contributors to the blog for the Swedish design/illustration/animation competition Kolla! Our first post is meant to inspire by looking back at some of the things that inspired us the most last year.
We are also talking about the magic of the moment just before the pen hits the paper or the camera starts rolling. You have the vision, but will you be able to capture it?
Read the post here! (In Swedish, but even if that doesn’t make any sense to you, you’ll still enjoy the movies!)
Kolla! 2014
Are you tired of the client and agency getting all the cred when you have worked your ass off actually making the stuff? Then Kolla! is for you! (If you are a swede that is.)
It’s a competition for the actual creators, who we think are the real heroes in this business. That’s why we were part of the jury last year. And this year we will be writing for their blog, highlighting Swedish talent and creative work!
Check it out! (In Swedish, sorry…)
Photo or 3D?
Jesper put together this little scene to show of his rendering skills. Doesn’t look very computer generated, right? Check out the next image to see that it’s actually fake! Photo or 3D?
Jesper put together this little scene to show of his rendering skills. Doesn’t look very computer generated, right? Check out the next image to see that it’s actually fake!
Giving something back
Andy and Erik just spent a few days in the woods of Småland, having pizza at Swedens best pizzeria and talking about pre-production at Campus i12. This is the school where five of us started our careers a loooong time ago, so it’s always nice to be able to give something back.
A new biker on the team
A big round of applause for Jonas who passed his final test for a motorcycle drivers license a few weeks ago! Yesterday he got his hands on this ugly beast from the nineties. Upper First is now 33% bikers. 
KitKat - behind the scenes KitKat - behind the scenes KitKat - behind the scenes KitKat - behind the scenes KitKat - behind the scenes KitKat - behind the scenes
A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds… A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds… A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds… A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds… A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds… A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds… A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds… A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds… A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds… A passion for miniatures
Jesper is one of our 3d wizards. But he doesn’t have to use his computer to do his magic. Here Jesper tells us a bit about his passion for building miniatures.
- I’ve been fascinated by miniatures since I was a kid. There’s something special happening when you shrink reality to a well made diorama or model. Some kind of magic that is hard to really put you finger on. And just as in other forms of art or craft there are several different factors that contribute to the final result.
- The craftsmanship is obviously important, as it’s often a very complicated task to recreate reality as a miniature. But that’s also a part of what make it so fascinating to watch. The aesthetic aspect is also crucial. Just as in traditional arts it’s important that the composition and colors work well together.
- The idea behind the model is also something that plays a major role. For example are a lot of miniatures made from historic scenes, with great attention to detail, and where a lot of time is spent on making it as realistic and as true as possible to the original.
- In other cases the miniatures have no ambition of replicating reality, but instead to entice the imagination of the viewer and take him to new, exciting worlds. A good example of this is the beautiful and humorous work of Christopher Boffoli. Another incredibly talented artist in this area is Takanori Aiba. Personally I’ve mostly been building historic miniatures, but I have the ambition to explore this more creative side of the craft as well, just as we do in our digital work.
- And what do you do when you have spent so many hours on a miniature, you might ask. You bring it to a miniature competition! And it’s just as geeky as it sounds…
OFFF - behind the scenes OFFF - behind the scenes OFFF - behind the scenes OFFF - behind the scenes OFFF - behind the scenes OFFF - behind the scenes OFFF - behind the scenes OFFF - behind the scenes OFFF - behind the scenes
{/blockleft:IfGoogleAnalyticsShortcode}